Tuesday, August 4, 2015

♥Never Swim When There's No Life Guard And Never Swim Alone♥


Drowning and Near-Drowning: Prevention and Treatment

Secondary drowning can cause death 48 hours after exposure to water

Drowning Doesn’t Look Like Drowning

Never, swim out further than you can swim back to shore from in 30 seconds.

Swim Safety The American Red Cross

Teach Children To Swim.

Picture Illustrations How to Do CPR on an Adult

How to Perform CPR

First, Dial 911



Infant/Child CPR



Never Mix Alcohol/Drugs With Activities Near, Or In The Water! 
Never Swim or Boat When Intoxicated!

Safe Boating


I just wanted to share my experiences and some good advice about swimming safety.

I keep reading in the news about young people drowning. So I wrote this for everyone, everywhere.

Rip Tides (current)

An extremely strong channel of water flowing seaward from near the shore (see photos), through the surf line. National Weather Service-Rip Current Safety

Typical flow is at 0.5 metres per second (1–2 feet per second), and can be as fast as 2.5 metres per second (8 feet per second).

Rip Current



Rip Current Identification



I grew up in Bayonne and Southern New Jersey (Brick Town. About 20 miles from Seaside Heights Boardwalk) and spent every summer swimming in its ocean and occasionally in its lakes. But mostly in the ocean.

I've swam at beaches, from Point Pleasant to Atlantic City.

The ocean is not a place for an inexperienced swimmer, no matter how calm it looks.

If caught in an outgoing tide; or rip tide, Don't Try To Swim In To The Shore. SWIM SIDEWAYS FROM ONE SIDE OF THE BEACH TO THE OTHER. Rip tides are sudden and are only in parts of the water.

Don't panic. If you swim sideways you will swim out of the rip tide affected water. It's impossible to fight the tide and try to swim in. It will just keep pulling you out further.

The ocean may look beautiful, inviting and fun, but it can also be very dangerous for anyone who is not a strong swimmer. If you don't swim really good. Swim in the motel pool and stay in the shallow end. Pools can be dangerous too.

Always wear a life jacket-(swim vest), if you are not an experienced swimmer and always when boating.

Children's Swim Vests

Adult's Swim Vests

(I have no interests in these above companies. I just wanted to provide some links where economical swim vests were available).

Use caution when swimming in lakes, rivers, streams and generally everywhere. Riverbeds, streams etc, often contain tree roots and other debris that a swimmer can get caught on.

The fresh water, unlike the salt water of the ocean, doesn't provide any buoyancy which helps you to float .

Buoyancy Salt Water vs. Fresh Water
by Chris Sullivan Also, the mud bottoms can pull one down.

Always wear a bathing suit when swimming (or at the most, cotton shorts and a tee shirt). Do Not wear heavy clothing, like jeans. You'll sink like a stone!

When in a desperate situation in the water you do not need an extra 8 pounds (aprox weight of a wet pair of jeans) pulling you down!

I learned how to swim by age five using a swim/life vest. I still almost drowned in a lake, once when I was a teenager.

I was just wading and stepped into a drop (also called a dip). The next thing I knew, I was over my head and going down.

I was wearing jeans and they became heavy as lead and were pulling me under and that was it!

Luckily I had the time to tear them off and then I managed to struggle back up to the surface.

At the time I was surrounded by people close enough to almost touch me. But apparently no one saw me go under.

I am a most experienced swimmer. If I can almost drown, anyone can!

NEVER SWIM, WHERE THERE IS NO LIFEGUARD PRESENT 
AND NEVER SWIM ALONE!

Never jump into unfamiliar water. As well as never dive into unfamiliar water.

One never knows how deep the water is, local and current tide strength, whether it's full of large rocks and other hazards that one can hit.

And Never Drive While Intoxicated! Not drunk, or stoned.



Mothers Against Drunk Driving/Quotations

Drunk Driving Prevention Tools
Make a Plan and Stick to the Plan.

Peace

Family Education Network


Greater Newark/New York Fresh Air Fund Sends Children To Summer Camp

Help For The Okiciyap Community Food Pantry/And A Links "Information-A-Thon" For Everyone. Full of Links to gov't resources for everyone, with great videos.

New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs US Consumer Product Safety Commission's top 10 tips to stay safe around the pool or spa article by-Jonathan Lin The Jersey Journal May 21, 2015 from, Office of The Attorney General

Never leave a child unattended in or near a pool or spa and always watch your children closely around all bodies of water.

Designate a Water Watcher to supervise children in the pool or spa.

This person should not be reading, texting, using a smart phone or be otherwise distracted. Adults can take turns being a Water Watcher.

Teach children basic water safety tips.
 
If a child is missing, look for him or her in the pool or spa first.
 
 Keep children away from pool drains, pipes and other openings to avoid entrapments.
 
Ensure any pool and spa you use has drain covers that comply with federal standards, and, if you do not know, ask your pool service provider whether your covers are in compliance.
 
Learn how to swim and teach your child how to swim.
 
Learn how to perform CPR on children and adults, and update those skills regularly.
 
Install a four-foot or taller fence around the perimeter of the pool and spa and use self-closing and self-latching gates; ask your neighbors to do the same at their pools.
 
Install and use a lockable safety cover on your spa.
 
Have lifesaving equipment such as life rings, floats or a reaching pole available and easily accessible.

The following are NJDCA's additional safety tips for beaches, lakes and rivers:

At beaches, lakes and rivers, make sure your children swim only in areas designated for swimming.
 
Don't let children dive into natural bodies of water; open water may have currents, undertow and hidden hazards under the surface.
 
Always make sure your child wears a life jacket approved by the US Coast Guard, when riding in a boat. Wear one yourself, for your own safety and to set a good example.
 
Avoid alcohol consumption when boating or swimming.
 
Ensure your boat's safety by taking advantage of free "Vessel Safety Checks" offered by the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary and United States Power Squadrons.

The CPSC's Pool Safely campaign provides information on the simple steps that parents, caregivers, and pool owners should take to ensure that children and adults stay safer in and around pools and spas.

The CPSC invites everyone to visit www.PoolSafely.gov/Pledge to take the pledge to help reduce drownings in the United States.

Stay Safe Everyone!
ga